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Feedbag: Thousand Kabobs

August 30, 2012
By

Thousand Kabobs

218 N. Liberty St. 21201

443-220-0066

www.1000kabobs.com and www.thousandkabobs.com

CP’s Sarenka Smith went to Thousand Kabobs in March, and came back enthralled with the place, calling its Pakistani cuisine “top-notch, aromatic, perfectly spiced, and completely authentic.” I have no grounds to argue. But today, I went there for something entirely different: to try out their kabob burgers ($5.99), which come with an order of French fries. The menu touts them with a catch-phrase – “East meets West and falls in love” – but I am going to nullify that marriage, right here and now.

Messing up French fries is surprisingly common, but these were worst than most: limp and greasy, with a chewy toughness that had me setting them aside immediately. But at least they were hot, unlike the burgers, which were varying degrees of lukewarm.

There are three kabob burgers on the menu: chicken, beef, and shami, which is beef minced with lentils, onions, and spices. Each came in a large, untoasted sesame-seed bun, and quickly started to fall apart in my hands, since the toppings – shredded lettuce, sliced tomatoes, cucumbers, raw onions, mayonnaise, yellow mustard, ketchup, and a slice of yellow cheese – turned into a slop that would’ve challenged anything short of a baguette or a bagel. The thin discs of pressed chicken and beef lacked flavor, though at least the beef had a firm mouth-feel. The shami disc, meanwhile, was nice and spicy (plenty of green chilis), but was so soft and mushy it reminded me of undercooked scrapple.

If you go to Thousand Kabobs – and you should – stick to the kabobs, biryani, curries, and tandoori. The kabob burgers and French fries will only turn you off the place.